How to tune in GT6 explained

People are always asking me how to tune transmission, suspension, or how to drift in Gran Turismo 6? I make lots of tunes and always get asked to make tunes for them or help them make a tune. Usually if they give me an explanation of what is happening to their car I can give some tips on things to adjust. Unfortunately it’s hard to tell people exactly how to tune since each situation and type of car is affected differently. So instead of explaining how to tune I’d explain how to tune based on your situation. This will give you a better idea of what to adjust when you run into a problem. You don’t need to be a master tuner just to make a car much better.

This guide is all about pure feel and is how I tune ALL my tunes no matter what it’s for. This guide will focus on racing, but check out my how to drift in guide and how to tune for drifting too.

Before anything you need to pick a car to tune. if you have never tuned a car before, or are still new to tuning please do not pick a car that is going to be insane. Pick something small with low to medium power. It will have fewer problems and they will be easier to correct. After that the first thing you want to do before you tune anything is drive the car. Set all the parts you want on the car and leave their values stock for now.

Go to a track you want it to be good at and just drive it. Do a couple laps just to get a good feel for what is happening. The first test drive is the most important because it tells you what is going on with your car currently to give you an idea of what to change later when you start to tune it. Pay attention to the little things that are happening such as how much oversteer or understeer it has, how fast it accelerates out of the corners, and any other areas of driving that seem strange to you. Obviously you need to be able to be a decent race car driver to get a accurate feel for what is happening. If you are reading this guide and playing Gran Turismo 6 I will assume you already know how to drive.

Parts

First we will talk about which parts to add. This is going to be a pretty short section since the parts are up to you. If you want a crazy HP monster adding all parts is what you are going to need however if you want to hit a certain PP level you would need to add parts accordingly. I do suggest if you are trying to hit a PP level that you aim for low weight.

Most PP levels are under 600pp and most tracks that they will be raced on are medium to small tracks. With that in mind 100% of the time lower power and lighter cars have worked much better than huge HP cars that weigh a ton. Every seasonal event I always make a quick tune to match the PP with low weight and haven’t lost yet. If the track is very large than I suggest go with more power.

Custom parts that don’t affect PP levels I suggest always adding. Customizable transmission and suspension for example. These parts can be added and allow you to adjust for any situation or any track in the future. Not to mention they can be tuned which is the entire point of this guide.

Oil change
The smallest, cheapest, and biggest difference in tuning. The second you buy your car go get an oil change. Only on very rare occasions will I not do one if I am trying to hit a PP level that is already close to my stock one. Other than that very rare situation always do them. They can add 20-100hp to your car right away. Your car comes with cheap oil and you are replacing it with racing oil basically.

Turbo or Supercharger?
Most of the time a car can have one or the other, but sometimes it has the option for either one. Basically superchargers add lot’s of power to the start and middle of the RPM’s and Turbo’s add it to only certain sections. The low turbo is at the start, medium turbo is in the middle, and high turbo is at the very end. What this means is when you are exiting a corner for example the RPM is very low since you are going slow. A low turbo or supercharger will blast power right at that second when you are exiting, but then slow the power once you are in higher RPM’s. Obviously a High turbo will keep most of the power for right at the end before you shift gears.

So which to choose? I usually go with the high turbo since it always gives the most power, but if your car is lacking in low RPM power you may want to get the low or medium turbo. It’s not about how much HP your car has it’s about how it uses it remember. Superchargers are great since they allow power in start and middle RPM area which is almost like having two turbos. Which to pick is up to you.

Tires
Tires are a big choice. From worst to best it goes comfort, sports, racing. Then you have hard, medium, soft inside of the main categories. Soft tires are always the best and what I would pick no matter what main category you picked. Sometimes in seasonal events they will force you to use sports hard tires, but if you have a tune that is built for sports soft your tune will still work fine just won’t perform as good due to the lower grade tires. If you made a tune for racing soft tires and an event calls for comfort medium good luck winning that race. Your car will be built to handle much better tires and will never be able to perform that well on much worse tires. Always plan what tires you want your car to use from the start.

An easy way to pick is just see how much HP your car has. If you are using a 1000+hp NISMO GTR you are going to want to stick to racing tires, but if you are tuning a Mini you can get away with sports or even comfort tires without the car getting crazy.

Racing Brakes
I get a lot of questions asking me why I usually do not use racing brakes on my tunes. The answer is literally because they are a waste. You can adjust the stock brakes for some reason making the racing brakes pointless. Usually when I add them they are too strong and I end up lowering them a lot anyways. However in recent updates you can now paint them. That makes them much more useful. Now I use them a lot purely for painting purposes.

Drivetrain
FR, FF, 4WD, MR, and RR these are all the choices your car may have. These different types stand for where the engine is vs which wheels are spinning. A FR car means front engine and rear wheeled drive, FF would mean front engine and front wheeled drive, 4WD means all four wheels are generating power, MR is mid engine and rear wheeled drive, and finally RR is rear rear engine and rear wheeled drive. Each one is set totally different from one another. I will be going over how to set each one depending on the parts, but if it doesn’t specify it means they are all the same. Transmission for example are not going to be changed by your drivetrain.

Aero/Wing/Spoiler

Getting into the deeper stuff now. Basically a wing allow you to have more downforce which keeps your tires planted onto the road. You always want your tires on the road at all times because only when they are on the road can they spin making you go faster. Pretty common sense. How high you set the downforce depends on how much downforce you want? If your car is handling great with no spoiler you could add one and add little downforce just to give it that extra grip. If you set it too high you run the risk of slowing it down on the straights and lowering it’s potential top speed.

Most basic spoilers you get in the shop will never hit a high enough level for this to be a problem, but it will make a difference for race cars. Race cars also usually have front and rear downforce. The settings for front or rear are the same idea as listed above. You can get even better control of a car playing around with different levels (higher front, lower rear or the opposite, etc), but we won’t be going into detail about that since few cars even offer front and rear downforce.

You usually want a spoiler on MR, FR, and 4WD cars, but NEVER on FF cars. The spoiler is located at the back which pushes air down onto the back tires. A FF car has the power in the front. If you have a spoiler pushing down the back that means the front will lift making the tires with the power get less grip. Total opposite of what you would want. The only time I add a spoiler to a FF car is for looks. Add one for looks alone, but lower it all the way to the left to make sure it barely adds any downforce.

Weight Balance

Your car weighs a certain amount and has a weight distribution. The best weight balance is 50/50 because everything is evenly spread throughout the car. Does that mean you should always add weight and adjust to hit 50/50? No. Many times the added weight will slow your car down making it pointless. It’s good if your car is spinning out you can shift more weight around and see if it helps, but there are also other ways to fix that problem. Suspension is what I would recommend over changing the weight balance and only when suspension changes do not fix your problems would I suggest adding weight.

Limited Slip Differential or LSD

The LSD controls when and how much power is released. There is Initial, Acceleration (Accel), and Braking. Like I mentioned from the start of this article I am not going to give you some secret formula to find the perfect ratio, but instead give you real world scenarios on how to change it to fix them. This makes tuning much easier.

Scenario one is your car spins the tires like crazy the second you touch the gas out of a corner. This happens all the time and is the most likely problem you will encounter. The problem is too much HP is being released when you press the gas in low RPM. An easy switch is use a high RPM turbo as that helps delivery power in higher RPM only, but many times even with the high turbo the car is still too crazy. A simple solution is lower the Accel super low maybe even to the lowest (5) and raise the Initial only a few numbers higher. Then set a medium number Braking. The lower power your car has the higher these numbers can be, but the ratio is still the same.

My Zonda R is insane and spins the tires like crazy, but with this simple LSD change it’s now much more manageable. The LSD settings are Initial 12, Accel 8, and Braking 25. So remember low first one, very low second, and medium to high last one. This allows the LSD to deliver just enough power without over revving causing tire spin.

Over revving is when the needle on your RPM gauge jumps all the way to the red line and looks like it’s bouncing on it. This means you need to shift up because you have too much power for that gear. Sometimes you don’t want to shift up right away like out of a corner which is where an LSD setup like I explained comes in handy. It stops excessive over revving and keeps a lower tire spin. Obviously huge HP cars like the Zonda R will never be fully tamed and still suffer from a bit wheel spin. Squeezing the gas out of the corners instead of slamming it down is your best bet to eliminate it and just general better for racing.

For FF cars things are the same, but slightly different. They usually have lower HP which allows the same setup, but with a bit higher numbers. A major problem with FF cars is understeer and a good LSD setup can drastically make a difference. You never want to hit the gas and have your car go straight rather than around the corner. If you slam the gas and your car only goes straight that is understeer. It means your LSD is too high forcing too much power out at once. Lower the numbers.

Transmission

Tuning a transmission in Gran Turismo 6 is one of the most difficult and confusing parts to tune. Many times I will receive tunes to test that will have all the settings changed, but stock transmission numbers. What works on one won’t work on another. I however have come up with a very simple way to tune a transmissions which makes tuning them a lot easier.

Basically, you have the gears, the final gear, and the top speed to change. They all work together and so is the order you tune them in. For all my tunes (expect drag) I set them top speed, gears, final. As long as there are no more transmission bug problems this is always the way to start with tuning a transmission. That means first change the top speed to where you want it, then change the individual gears, and finally change the final gear. Occasionally people will tell me they can’t hit the number I have told them to put in. You may run into the same problem and not even know it.

The key is to add all power parts first! Very important you do this because the transmission ratios are all based off of how much power you car has. If you try to tune it without any power parts installed that is a totally different setup than if you had them all installed to begin with.

Now pay attention because this could get confusing, but I will try to make it easy to understand. After you do your untuned test drive you will see many problems. With transmission a problem may be too much power when you hit the gas out of a corner. It can be fixed with LSD, but can be much better with transmission tuning and LSD tuning combined.

So the problem is you hit the gas and the tires spin way too much.
The solution is raise the top speed to the right (higher numbers). You base how high to move it depending on how insane your car is. My Ferrari FXX is super insane with huge power and has a very high top speed (286mph). A high top speed makes sure to allow for a very smooth delivery of the power. It applies the power as evenly as it can throughout the gears.

Now the the gears themselves are next to set. Move the gears to the right to lower the initial power or to the left to give it more power. For example you are in gear 2 out of a corner and it feels like there is just no power. You would want to move gear to to the left to give more power to gear 2. I suggest following the same for all the other gears as well. So if you move gear 2 to the left move all the gears to the left. However how much is up to you. I try to stick to an even spacing between gears (on the graph) as the most important part when setting a transmission. The even spacing makes sure even power distribution. You can make it different between them for power curves etc, but that makes things much more complicated.

Finally, time to set the final gear. The final gear is really the main gear that should only be moved ever again. Think of your transmission as locked from now on, but the final gear can still move. Do another test drive and see how the car performs. If you are decently happy with everything it’s time to change the final gear.

Pretty much, if your car is still too crazy with the tires spinning move the final gear to the left to stretch out the gears more. If it’s now become a little low on power and could use more of it move the final gear to the right to shorten up everything. Do a test drive and come back. How much to move the final depends on your car, but the good thing is the final can be changed whenever and won’t move any of the gears or top speed.

If you move the top speed, however, all your gears and final gear will be messed up forever. Only way to fix it is by resetting the transmission and starting over. This is why I highly suggest only moving the final gear once the top speed and gears have been set. If you find your car is still a problem and would benefit from a higher top speed, reset the transmission and start again. It’s much easier to start fresh than to try and adjust little differences between gears etc.

You may also have a problem of hitting the rev limiter
This means you are on a straight and slam the gas fully down, but reach the last gear and the needle starts bouncing off the redline. You need to shift up, but are out of gears. So what do you do? A simple solution is to raise the top speed up a lot first, set the gears, and set the final. The gears and final are the same way as listed above.

Important note on top seed.
Top speed is something you change first and can not be changed any time later. It is very important you get it right the first time or you will have to start all over. The good new is if you are a little off you can always adjust the final gear at the end more than you planned to even things out. Usually if a car has added power from tuning you are always going to raise the top speed, but how much depends on the car and PP level etc you want to hit. On lower HP cars you may want to lower the top speed to make it feel like it has more power and adjust the gears and final accordingly.

Suspension

When making a tune the only thing that really matters is oversteer and understeer. Either your car has some oversteer or it has some understeer. The point of the tune is to correct the situation to find the perfect balance. The whole time driving your car and making the tune that is all your should be thinking about. Once you start looking for one or the other it makes tuning much simpler.

GT6 Suspension tuning is similar to transmission tuning as it can be quite difficult to get right, but there are some easy thing to remember that make tuning simpler. This is the one area that is drastically different between FF, FR, 4WD, MR, and RR. Don’t worry however as I will be explaining for all them.

First we will start with the basics on what everything does.

Ride height is the height of your car from the ground. The lower your car sits the low the centre of gravity which makes the handling much better. The problem is if you set it too low your car won’t have enough travel room for the suspension to move when it goes over bumps or hills. This is the most difficult part of suspension tuning. It’s very difficult to get a tune that works on smooth tracks, bump tracks, short tracks, long tracks, etc.

Ideally, you want a separate tune for each track condition. All my race tunes should work everywhere fine, but you would notice a big difference if I made a track version for one specific track. The easiest thing to do is pick a track that has pretty much everything. Long straights, bumps, sharp turns, wide turns etc. This will give you a balanced tune to your car. If you plan on racing it only at bumpy tracks obviously pick one of them and tune strictly for bumpy tracks.

I usually tune my cars at one medium size track with a few hills, and straights, etc and then again at a track with much longer straights. This way I can make sure it has the ability to make sharp turn, handle some bumps, and still have a high top speed.

For really straight smooth tracks like Monza having the ride height very low will be the best. The suspension won’t travel around too much anyway making the lowered centre of gravity much more beneficial.

For bumpy tracks like The Nurburgring a much higher ride height is needed. This allows the suspension to raise or lower much more absorbing bumps.

For tracks that aren’t super bumpy or super smooth in-between settings are best. I personally like my cars to be a little lower than needed and always set them with low numbers, but not slamming them to the ground. Many times the max lowness might be 70 and I’ll set mine to 80-85. This allows them to have a lower centre of gravity, but still some room for suspension to move up and down. Bumpy tracks I would set this much higher.

Another thing to realize is the ride height like all the rest of the suspension can be set separately from the front or rear. To make it simple raising the front ride height higher than the rear will provide more understeer and having a higher rear ride height will provide more oversteer.

FF cars usually start with lots of understeer and having a higher rear ride height will provide a better ability to turn. While a FR car might have a lot of oversteer meaning you would want to have a higher front ride height.

It’s actually quite similar for all the other settings too.  Anything in the front will make the car understeer more and anything in the rear will cause it to oversteer more. That is really the basics of suspension tuning.

My Honda CR-Z a which is an FF has a bad case of understeer when I first got it. With some small changes I got rid of the understeer.

FRONT REAR
Ride Height 85 90
Spring Rate 9.00 7.57
Compression 6 6
Extension 7 8
Anti-Roll 4 5
Camber 2.0 2.6
Toe -0.05 0.10

As you can see the settings are heavily focused to the rear to provide more oversteer. How much of these values depends how bad your cars problems are. The CR-Z wasn’t too bad so the difference between front and rear is minimal. In most cases only one number difference will make a difference.

Spring Rate

The spring rate is what absorbs the bumps. Lower numbers mean it absorbs more (softer) and higher numbers means it absorbs less (stiffer). Higher numbers however provide a stiffer ride which is much better for racing. Like with ride height if you race on smooth tracks setting it quite stiff is fine since there is no bumps, but take it to a track with lots of bumps and your car will be flying all over the place. The suspension just won’t be able to absorb the bumps and instead will transfer the bumps to the car causing it to physically jump itself.

How high?
Not to be confused with the Method Man movie How High we set the numbers again depends on your situation. Number one is to set it similar to the ride height. If you have a very slammed ride hight your spring rate is going to be very high because you don’t have the travel room. If your ride height it fairly high you can set the spring rate lower to absorb more.

Basically if your car is bouncing around and is too aggressive for you lowering the spring rate is the thing to do. This will let it absorb more of the track instead of bouncing around.

Also like the ride height if you have a higher front than rear ride height to provide more understeer you would want a similar style for the spring rate.

Dampers. Compression and Extension.

Similar to the spring rate the dampers provide even more bump absorption. They are set in the same style as the last two. After tuning so much I have found a great tip that makes tuning them much easier.

For example if your car has tons of power and is bouncing around you want to set higher compression than extension. The compression allows the car to dip down and with high HP cars many times the tires will spin causing the car to bounce and spin everywhere, but a high compression allows the car to dip down almost into the power forcing it to go forward.

The Aston Martin One-77 is one of the craziest cars with virtually the most amount of HP in the game. Tuning it was a nightmare due to the huge power. However setting a much higher compression than extension let it absorbs the power putting it into the road.

FRONT REAR
Ride Height 85 87
Spring Rate 9.67 9.97
Compression 7 7
Extension 5 5
Anti-Roll 2 2
Camber 1.2 1.0
Toe -0.27 0.37

As you can see that car is two numbers higher in compression than extension. If you wanted it to absorb more I would recommend having a larger gap between numbers. Something like 6 compression and 3 extension.

If you do not have a problem with your car getting out of control everywhere settings an even compression and extension is fine or a higher extension is fine. Most of the time I will set a little bit higher extension numbers for my cars and only the craziest cars will have higher compression numbers instead.

Anti-Roll bars

Like I have said a million times already they are set in the same way the rest of the suspension is. If you have higher ride height and higher spring rate in the front etc you continue to have higher number on the front for anti-roll bars.

The roll bars control the side movement. If you are looking at a car dead on only rocking it left and right is what they do and not forward and backwards. This is important to understand because the roll bars do not matter at all for straight lines and braking. They only matter when going around a corner since that is when your car would be leaning left or right. in the car world we call this body roll.

Lower numbers mean the car will travel more to the side absorbing more force, but too low you risk absorbing too much slowing you down. Higher numbers make the car much stiffer, but too high and the car may not absorb enough of the sidewards force causing you to slide right off the track.

I usually like to keep my anti-roll bars a bit on the low side, but also more in the middle. I find 3 or 4 works well most of the time. If a car is too crazy and needs more absorption I’ll lower it to 2. Obviously if it’s rolling too much and I want it stiffer I’ll raise it. Heavier cars usually work well with a lower anti-roll bar settings since more weight will be traveling to the sides when cornering and needs to be absorbed.

The front and rear settings also make a difference. Like the rest of suspension tuning higher front is more understeer and high rear is more oversteer. The higher numbers mean it’s stiffer forcing the car to stay upright instead of roll. You may want the front wheels to absorb a lot of the force so the rear wheels can power you through the turn. Like everything you may want higher front numbers to allow the car to stay stiff and be more targeted around a turn while the rear is softer to absorb the power. For starting out even settings is what I recommend and after you have the entire tune done try adjusting a little in front or rear to see how it changes the cars characteristics.

Camber

Camber is tricky in GT6 as many people reported problems with it when the game first came out. I too found camber to be troublesome when trying to tune. Not so much on racing, but drift cars it was horrible. I just couldn’t get a proper tune and only later found out it was because of camber problems. Now there have been many updates to the game and I am using much more camber in my tunes. Camber doesn’t even have to be used and I suggest setting it last. It’s only to add that little extra to your tune. If your car just can’t quite get around a corner at the speeds you’d like than adding a touch of camber will help it out.

Camber-explained

Picture a car dead on looking at you. The tire would be 100% vertical. Camber shifts the wheel to be slightly offset. This allows you to take a turn and have the inner wheel be vertical providing the most grip and the outer tires to turn slightly slower due to less grip. This is why I suggest using only small amount of it because higher amounts won’t make your car steer very well around a corner or in a straight line. If you look above to the Aston Martin tune one 1.2 in the front and 1.0 in the rear. Small settings can make a huge difference.

Front camber allows the car to turn better since the front wheels are what steer the car. Rear camber is used in combination with the front to allow the rear of the car to turn evenly. More in the rear if your car has understeer.

Toe

My favorite setting is the toe. Toe settings to me makes the biggest difference to a cars characteristics. Of course everything works together, but the toe can be the difference between a good tune and great tune.

Toe-explained

The toe is like camber only the opposite direction. Picture a car looking at it from the top down the tires should be 100% straight, but when you add toe the tires will now either point in or point out. Negative toe means they point out and positive toe means they point in.

The more positive toe you have the more stable your car will be and the more negative toe the more oversteer your car will have. Positive toe points things inwards which is good for straight lines, but too much sucks for turns. It will always want to go straight. The opposite is true for negative toe.

I have found rear toe is usually what to adjust first. For FF cars that always have lots of understeer adjusting the rear toe into the low negatives like -0.10 etc will allow the car to turn much better. For MR cars that usually have lots of oversteer giving even more positive rear toe is usually needed. Basically if your car has understeer you want negative rear toe, but if it has oversteer you want positive rear toe.

The front toe is a little bit different. Negative front toe is sometimes needed. Most of the time just a little bit helps the car turn better, but the more you add will make the car more stable. Back to the MR car example that might have a lot of oversteer. You would set a lot of positive rear toe to keep the rear from sliding around and a decent amount of front negative toe. This allows the car to stay stable on the corners and straights.

The balance between them is the key. You don’t want to have a huge amount of positive rear toe and huge amount of negative front toe because your car won’t turn at all. It will feel like it’s locked into going straight. However if the car you are trying to tune is super crazy and oversteers like mad very high settings will be fine.

Brakes

The brakes are usually overlooked as not that important, but can make or break a good tune (get the pun?). There are racing brakes and the normal brakes. I honestly don’t know why they allow you to adjust the normal brakes because it makes the racing brakes pointless. The higher settings on normal brakes will make them brake harder which is the whole point of racing brakes. Also racing brakes once added usually are too strong and need to be lowered anyways.

However you can paint racing brakes which to me is a good reason to add them. Even if you add them and adjust for low settings it makes the car look a lot cooler when it has custom painted brake calibers.

There are two parts to the brakes. The strength and the balance (front or rear). Basically if you brake and your car starts spinning out or going crazy at all you want higher settings in the front of the brakes. If the car is stable when applying the brakes even settings or more towards the rear is fine.

An important factor when trying to adjust brakes is the tires. When driving around pay attention to what color your tires are when you apply the brakes. Ideally you want the front and rear to look blue which means an even amount of pressure is being applied. What you don’t want, but usually happens is the front tires will turn red. The problem is tricky to solve as it could be too much front, or rear brake pressure. Obviously, too much front brakes would cause them to squeeze too hard locking the tires and making the car slide as opposed to gradually braking. At the same time too much in the rear can lock the back forcing weight onto the front again causing it to slide.

The weight balance of your car and the surface of the road (going down a hill etc) are also factors. The easiest way to fix this is adjust both the front and back brakes to be even and lower them. Low numbers like 2-3 and drive around again. Lower settings let the brakes squeeze down, but not lock. The last thing you want is to be going very fast into a corner and the brakes lock. You will slide right off the track and into the wall. Of course the same is true for too low settings. The brakes won’t clamp on as hard and your car will still go into the wall.

The way you drive also makes a difference. I do not suggest you ever slam down on the brakes ever. Always approach a turn with a slight amount of brake pressure and gradually increase the pressure until you have come to a slow enough speed to make the turn. I try to press down about half way to slow things down and slowly move to full pressure. This is a lot easier to do when you use a wheel, but can also easily be done if using my suggested controller setup.

Torque Split

This is only for 4WD cars as it allows you to control how much power is going to the front or rear wheels. Most of the time I find 4WD cars have a lot of understeer because they have too much power going to the front wheels. The torque split makes that easy to adjust by simply setting it higher in the back and lower in the front. If you go all the way to a 10/90 split it is almost like transforming that car into a FR. So much power is going to the rear wheels and almost non to the front.

There is a lot of benefit to leaving it with a more neutral split, however. Oversteer is basically non existent which is hard to avoid on large HP cars. Something like 25/75 is usually a good way to get a lot of understeer out of the picture while still maintaining a lot of grip on the road. Anywhere from 40/60 to about 20/80 split is a good range to stay in. Past that in either direction and it starts to either defeat the purpose of 4WD or just adds too much understeer.

Recap

That’s pretty much it to tuning. You just drive a little, make some adjustments and drive to see if they helped or not. Continue to do that until the tune is perfect. Once you become even better at this it becomes easier to guess which settings need to be changed from the first test drive. Most of the time I can drive the car stock and already know exactly what to adjust and have a decent tune the first try. Some cars are more difficult and take many more attempts to get right.

Just remember oversteer and understeer are the main things to focus on. Your goal as a tuner is to find the perfect balance. Sometimes a car is just too insane and that balance will never be found, but getting it close enough is going to be better than stock.

I should also note I drive the EXACT same track until I’m done tuning. It’s important you drive the same track for the entire tune. It makes it easier to judge if you have helped or hurt with you tuning adjustments from the last lap. Only once I am happy with my tune do I go to a different track and tune a little more for that track. I usually aim for about 3-5 seconds improvement per lap from a stock setup (including additional parts).

Sometimes I will have a tune that gets fast laps, but is just too hard to control for the average driver and will tone it down a little. It may be a bit slower, but most people will find it faster due to the ease of use. Of course you guys will be making the tune for yourself and not working about sharing with others so tune for your liking.

If you do make a great tune feel free to message me it on the Team Shmo Facebook page and I can test it out and tell you my thoughts. Or check out the best screen recorders and record a lap with you tune and upload it to YouTube. Please be sure to share this guide with others who may be struggling with how to tune in GT6. Hopefully you found this guide useful and it helps you with your tuning goals, good luck!

  • SgtStig

    So your going to make me get off my butt and do all this myself?!?! Haha, JK. I’ve always had a good idea of how to make a decently tuned car but this page will definitely make things easier for me. Thanks Shmo!

    • Technically you can still sit whether you enter mine or make your own Lol. This guide is more for people who want to edit one of my tunes or for cars they really want tuned but I don’t have a tune for.

  • Cunha

    Never use spoiler on a ff car? Bro…you are doing it wrong!

    • lol looks are only reason

      • Cunha

        The down force it bigger only at high speed, so it will not leaf the front of the car on the starts. And turning…you know, like the wind lol
        Loved the rest of the page. Keep the good work.

        • It only creates drag. It’s supposed to press down on the rear wheels. That’s the whole point so they get more grip when turning. Front wheel drive cars being pushed down on the back will cause front lift which isn’t what you want.

          • Cunha

            The air drag situation is right, but only make sense on tracks like route x.
            The spoiler press down the back, but all the car body press down the front, you will never have a so big spoiler that lift the front tires at the point of losing traction.
            My dc5 intregra with a 2.0 engine laped the nurburgring in just 6:55, just more 5 seconds that my evo and its a fwd car with a spoiler, a big one in fact. You can feel all the car get pressed and speed at the curves had no comparation. In the streigts it’s get a little more time to rev but its all more controled.

          • What settings you use on it?

  • THEmajicCARPET

    The info i learned on this is soo helpful i even help my tune my friends cars on forza lol with this info i learned and i recommend this page to them too even tho they play forza

    • Glad it’s helping. I try to share it with anyone online who ask how to tune. Certain things will vary game to game, but overall on how things work is the same for any race game or cars in general.

  • LankyRunner

    A lot of the points in there answer the question as to why my M4 is such a handful – it’s in need of a good suspension tune!!

  • Zac Price

    Hey, can you give me some quick advice for transmission and LSD tuning for drag racing specifically. Im trying to make a drag tune for my 300ZX Z32 and I have everything good except the transmission and LSD. I don’t have a good drag track to race on but i’m tuning the transmission using the “drag” strip on Indianapolis Road Course, starting with my back wheels on the yellow and black striped lines and ending at the second overhead bridge This may or may not be a good way to test my speeds but this is what I have:

    Specs:
    634pp
    All parts installed + oil change.
    873HP
    1208KG
    Twin Turbo
    91 kgfm Torque

    Transmission:
    Final: 4000
    Top Speed: Slider all the way to the left.
    1st: 3.328
    2nd: 2.440
    3rd: 1.882
    4th: 1.516
    5th: 1.275
    6th: 1.072
    Final: 2.500 (Slider all the way to the left.)

    LSD:
    Initial: 30
    Acceleration: 19
    Braking: 40

    When I hit the second banner my speed is 246km/s (152m/h).
    Im trying to get at least over 255km/h.
    All my assists are off except ABS at 1.

    Im not asking you to do a whole tune for this car, (Even though that would be great.) I just want some advice on anything i’m doing wrong for a drag tune. I know it may be hard if you haven’t driven the car but any advice would be appreciated.

    • It’s really impossible to give detailed advice without testing it myself. I’m gonna write a drag tune guide soon, so stick around for that, but it’s still gonna be hard to say exactly what you should do. For all tuning, trial and error is the only way that works.

      • Zac Price

        Alright cheers.

      • genaro jackson

        Okay I actually I have a good tip about drag racing tune make sure your gears are even together make sure your gears are not too high or not too low because if u have the gears to high it won’t launch well too short means wheels so u gotta have a right transmission gearing and shifting point that’s how u drag tune a car

        • genaro jackson

          Also another tip make sure your gears are close together but also evenly but don’t put the gears too close or u have too much wheel spin make sure your gears are not making a big gap between each other the gears have to be just right don’t make the gap between the gears too big or too small make it just right depending on the car your using and how much horsepower your running and torque weight distribution

  • Oon Chusattayanond

    Just came across this article, great job 😉

    I’m just curious about the transmission tuning. If I have to lower my car’s power limiter (to match the PP requirement), will I have to re-tune the transmission? I tried this earlier with MR car and it handles quite weirdly during down shifting and acceleration. It might be something else though.

    cheers

    • It depends on how much you are lowering it. If you have to limit it a lot I suggest taking off power parts first to hit the lower pp and limiting power if you have to after that. If your transmission is set for full power and now it’s being lowered a lot you will definitely need to fix your transmission to match the new power curve. The easiest thing to do is move the final gear only to the right. This will shorten everything to allow for more power right away, but still maintain the spacing you already made from before.

      • Oon Chusattayanond

        Thanks for your reply. I actually tried adjusting the final gear just like you suggested but things were still weird. It turned out, though, that the event forced me to use the harder tires, which I didn’t noticed, and the problem was the diff settings (SOLVED).

        By the way, you said “…I suggest taking off power parts first to hit the lower pp…” and I noticed something. After I limit the power output, power curve is flat (at certain maximum HP) with a wider RPM in contrast to taking off power parts, which yields narrower maximum power RPM range. Would it be better to have maximum (but limited) power for wider RPM range, rather than a peaky one.

        Cheers

        (sorry for my broken English. It’s my second language)

        • I’ve had mixed results with power limiting vs taking off parts, but taking off power parts is best for much lower pp events. This will keep the power curve more natural. Also, when I say much lower pp events I mean your car currently has 656pp and you need it to be 550pp. That’s a pretty drastic difference and taking off power parts first is best. Power limiting is more for going from 634pp to 600pp for example.

          • genaro jackson

            Does the car handle better if you do this? That’s what’s I’m wondering here because I don’t know how it will effect my turning on corners in racing

          • I’d assume it’d be pretty similar to before. However, the additional acceleration by setting the transmission properly might make it oversteer a tiny bit giving you sharper turning.

  • Brandon Boyd

    Yo I got this corvette zri it modded crazy-it’s has everything and so far I’ve been able to keep it under control but now it’s starting to rebel-I can’t get it to stabilize I read your post and applied what I could and it helped but the car is still unruly lol it’s over 1000hp and weighs only 1200 kg I love the car I want it to work but I need help tuning it to stay strong and flat (especially conering)…on the road and not slide everywhere.

    • Lower the lsd to the lowest for the first two and the last one to around 30. Also, add a lot more positive rear Toe and a lot of negative front Toe. This should help the car stay staright and stable and also not let the tires spin up as much.

  • Slyder

    I have a question regarding upgrades.

    Lets use weight reduction as an example. There are three stages of weight reduction, In the past I have always bought each stage. 1 2 3 at one time. Even if i have money for the most expensive stage. I have always wondered, and i guess my question is. If i skip to the 3rd stage am i missing out by not buying the 2 stages before it?

    Just like the Engine upgrades i have always bought every stage even if i could afford the Final Stage. Say i jumped into stage 3 Engine tuning without buying stage 1 & 2, am i loosing something in between? I can understand why the turbo has different stages, i have just always wondered about the other upgrades

    Is it necessary to buy all three stages of a particular upgrade? Or will the final stage do

    • I only do the last stage as I assume it does them all. However, an easy way to check this is do stage 3 and then check stage 1 and see if your weight goes down any more. I am almost positive it won’t and just doing stage 3 right away does them all. The last one is usually the best right away. The only time I haven’t found that to be the case is with turbos. On very rare occasions the stage 2 turbo will actually give more hp and torque. Again, this is very rare and probably less than 1% of cars in the entire game. Easiest way to check is select stage 2 and see the hp (don’t buy it) then select stage 3 and see the hp. Whichever has more, buy that.

  • Daniel

    Hey I’m trying to set up a cobra 454 to handle like a gt 40 mark 1 1966. Basically I want it loose as a goose. Can any one help me?

    • Lower it, max the lsd, and set it to around – 15 rear Toe. Should be on your way to a drift car it will be so loose lol

      • Daniel

        Thank you I’ll give it a shot

  • destroycars8

    Hey, can you help me at tuning my Supra for top speed, under 510 PP, And 410 HP? It’s made for Wangan (highway racing, on the Special Stage Route 7) And I need to break 190 Mph, and I want to reach 205 Mph, But Everyone else is faster than me, they get to 190-199 faster than me, I get up there too late, and I get stuck at 195

    • Search for Supra in the search bar as I have a top speed version already. It has full hp, but is extremely fast.

      • destroycars8

        I already have that Supra for top speed, but I wanted the other one under 510 PP and 410 HP, Which the SZ-R might be good

        • I think you could use the same tune with less power. However, for the transmission, cut the final gear and top speed in the tune to make up for less power.

  • gtgodzilla

    guide for tuning for drag racing pls

    • I planned on doing one, but with the release of gt sport I unfortunately won’t be making one anymore

  • gtgodzilla

    what are the general settings for tuning for rally?
    I’m going to try tune my wrx 04 for this, but I’m not really sure

    • Check my rally tunes section as I might already have that car. I think I actually have a rally running guide too. Check the guides section. However, the suspension is most important and is usually a lot higher than a race car. You need more ground clearance and springs that absorb.